Analects 12.22

Original Text:

樊迟问仁子曰爱人问知子曰知人樊迟未达子曰举直错诸枉能使枉者直樊迟退见子夏曰乡也吾见于夫子而问知子曰举直错诸枉能使枉者直何谓也子夏曰富哉言乎舜有天下选于众举皋陶不仁者远矣汤有天下选于众举伊尹不仁者远矣

Translation:

Other Translations:

Fan Chi asked about Goodness.

The Master replied, “Care for others.”

He then asked about wisdom.

The Master replied, “Know others.”

Fan Chi still did not understand, so the Master elaborated: “Raise up the straight and apply them to the crooked, and the crooked will be made straight.”

Fan Chi retired from the Master’s presence. Seeing Zixia, he said, “Just before I asked the Master about wisdom, and he replied, ‘Raise up the straight and apply them to the crooked, and the crooked will be made straight.’ What did he mean by that?”

Zixia answered, “What a wealth of instruction you have received! When Shun ruled the world, he selected from amongst the multitude, raising up Gao Yao, and those who were not Good then kept their distance. When Tang ruled the world, he selected from amongst the multitude, raising up Yi Yin, and those who were not Good then kept their distance.”

Confucius, & Slingerland, E. (2003). Analects: With selections from traditional commentaries. Hackett Publishing.

Fan Chi asked about humaneness. The Master said, Love others. Fan Chi asked about understanding. The Master said, Understand others.

When Fan Chi failed to grasp the meaning, the Master said, Promote the straight, and let them oversee the crooked. That way, you can cause the crooked to be straight.

After Fan Chi had left the Master, he met Zixia. A while ago, he said, I met the Master and asked him about understanding. He said, Promote the straight, and let them oversee the crooked—that way you can cause the crooked to be straight. What does that mean?

Zixia said, How rich in meaning—these words! When Shun ruled the empire, he chose Gao Yao from among the multitude—and those who lacked humaneness were kept at a distance. When Tang ruled the empire, he chose Yi Yin from among the multitude—and those who lacked humaneness were kept at a distance.

Confucius, & Watson, B. (2007). The Analects of Confucius. Columbia University Press.

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